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CYCLING PERFORMANCE TIPS

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Cardiologists Rockville MD

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Cardiologists. You will find helpful, informative articles about Cardiologists, including "HEART RATE MONITORS". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Rockville, MD that will answer all of your questions about Cardiologists.

Richard Hart, MD
(703) 241-1010
6400 Arlington Blvd
Falls Church, VA
Business
MSG of NOVA
Specialties
Cardiology

Data Provided By:
Joel Alvin Reiskin, MD
(301) 468-8999
6000 Executive Blvd
Rockville, MD
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Diseases
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ, Winston-Salem Nc 27157
Graduation Year: 1963
Hospital
Hospital: Suburban Hospital, Bethesda, Md; Shady Grove Adventist Hospital, Rockville, Md
Group Practice: Reisken & Schreiner

Data Provided By:
Mohsin Ijaz
(301) 816-9000
11119 Rockville Pike
Rockville, MD
Specialty
Cardiology

Data Provided By:
Timothy Gawthrop Hoopes, MD
(301) 924-1065
4861 Sweetbirch Dr
Rockville, MD
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Jefferson Med Coll-Thos Jefferson Univ, Philadelphia Pa 19107
Graduation Year: 1988

Data Provided By:
Richard I Weinstein
(301) 670-3000
15225 Shady Grove Rd
Rockville, MD
Specialty
Cardiology, Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided By:
Yukitaka Shizukuda, MD
(301) 496-0130
10500 Rockville Pike Unit M12
Rockville, MD
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Sapporo Med Coll, Chuo-Ku, Sapporo, Japan
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided By:
William C DeVries, MD, FACC
(202) 782-8487
7 Snowmound Ct
Rockville, MD
Specialties
Cardiology, Vascular Surgery, Thoracic Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided By:
Bernard H Ostrow, MD, FACC
(301) 571-1738
14100 Stathmore Park Ct Apt 402
Rockville, MD
Specialties
Cardiology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided By:
Paul M Hwang, MD
(301) 435-3068
5802 Nicholson Ln Apt 307
Rockville, MD
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Johns Hopkins Univ Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21205
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided By:
Daniel Joseph Goldberg, MD
(301) 770-7979
6116 Executive Blvd Ste 155
Rockville, MD
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: New York Med Coll, Valhalla Ny 10595
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

HEART RATE MONITORS

 



CONTENTS

  • Basic cardiovascular physiology
  • Pros and cons of using a heart rate monitor
  • Definitions
  • Calculating your maximum heart rate
  • Heart rate training zones
  • Training tips using a heart rate monitor
  • Resting heart rate
  • An opposing opinion The Heart Rate Monitor (HRM) is touted by many cyclists and trainers as the most significant training advance in the last ten years. Although many coaches refuse to work with an athlete without the physiologic training information it provides, HRMs have their detractors. And that small backlash is slowly growing. An alternative to a HRM, not quite as technical and rigid, uses perceived effort as a measure of your level of exertion.

    BASIC CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY

    First, let's review the basic physiology of the circulatory system asking ourselves the question "What does the heart rate really indicate?" The components of the cardiovascular system are:
    • the heart (the pump)
    • the arteries (a distribution system)
    • the capillaries (the exchange system where gases, nutrients, and other chemical compounds move to and from surrounding tissue
    • the veins (which are the return circuit) With every heart beat (contraction of the heart pump), a certain amount of blood (stroke volume) is pushed through the system. The contraction frequency of the heart is the heart rate (HR). The amount of blood moved to the cells of the body every minute is the product of the heart rate and stroke volume (HR x strove volume).

      With physical activity (exercise) more oxygen is required by the muscle cells, and the circulatory system responds by increasing the heart rate (and the cardiac output). With aerobic training, the actual amount of blood pumped per heart beat (stroke volume) increases and the efficiency of the exchange process at the capillary level improves. The result is a lower heart rate for any level of physical activity in the trained versus the untrained individual. Thus aerobic training benefits include:

      • a lower resting heart rate
      • a lower heart rate for a specific level of exertion
      • an increased exercise capacity at an individual's maximum heart rate. The training effect results when the heart muscle is "stressed" by an increase in cardiac output (just as muscles in the arms and legs respond to the stress of lifting free weights). As the cardiac output is directly proportional to the heart rate, a heart rate monitor (HRM) can be used to structure and monitor an aerobic training program. (For additional background see Basic Exercise Physiology - the cardiac system.)

        Let's look at the pros and cons on the use of a HRM.

        PROS AND CONS

        The ADVANTAGES of a HRM include its use:

        • as a motivational tool - like a coach ; brings objectivity to a training program.
        • to teach beginners to read their bodies and avoid anaerobic overtraining.
        • to aid in doling out energy during time trialing or climbing, saving some for the final effort.
        • to analyze ra...

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