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CYCLING PERFORMANCE TIPS

"Knowledge is the key to improving your cycling performance."

- CPT mission statement -

Sports Nutritionists Ansonia CT

Sports nutritionists provide access to customized nutritional plans for athletes, such as calorie and nutrient needs assessment, dietary analysis, nutritional strategies, and vitamin and supplement review. They also treat clinical issues such as iron deficiency. Read on to learn more and to find qualified sports nutritionists in Ansonia, CT.

Norma Camacho D.C. & Daniel Tarifi D.C.
(203) 248-7200
3281 Whitney Ave
Hamden, CT
Business
Hamden Chiropractic Health and Spine Center L
Specialties
Chiropractic, Auto Accident Care, Workers Comp, Slip and Fall, Family Care, Nutrition, and Muscle Theraphy
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: Most Plans Accepted
Medicare Accepted: Yes
Workmens Comp Accepted: Yes
Accepts Uninsured Patients: Yes
Emergency Care: Yes

Doctor Information
Medical School: Life University , 01
Additional Information
Languages Spoken: English,Spanish

Data Provided By:
Stanley John Dudrick, MD
(203) 709-6314
56 Franklin St
Waterbury, CT
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Pa Sch Of Med, Philadelphia Pa 19104
Graduation Year: 1961
Hospital
Hospital: Bridgeport Hosp, Bridgeport, Ct; St Marys Hosp, Waterbury, Ct

Data Provided By:
Douglas A Rofrano, MD
(203) 574-3655
279 Oakville Ave Apt A22
Waterbury, CT
Specialties
Family Practice, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Languages
Italian, Spanish
Education
Medical School: Georgetown Univ Sch Of Med, Washington Dc 20007
Graduation Year: 1951

Data Provided By:
Ddd Nutrition Svc
(203) 795-6746
391 Old Silo Rd
Orange, CT
Hours
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday: Closed

Mary Savoye
(203) 785-2140
800 Howard Ave
New Haven, CT
Hours
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday: Closed

Martin Herbert Floch, MD
(203) 737-6061
PO Box 208019
New Haven, CT
Specialties
Gastroenterology, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Languages
Spanish
Education
Medical School: New York Med Coll, Valhalla Ny 10595
Graduation Year: 1956
Hospital
Hospital: Norwalk Hosp, Norwalk, Ct
Group Practice: Norwalk Hospital

Data Provided By:
University of Bridgeport
(203) 576-4552
126 Park Ave.
Bridgeport, CT
Specialty
Acupressure, Acupuncture, Ayurveda, Chiropractors, Colon Therapy, Herbology, Homeopathy, Integrative Medicine, Kinesiology, Massage Therapy, Naturopathy, Nutrition, Physical / Exercise Therapy, Reflexology, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Water Therapy
Associated Hospitals
Naturopathic Medical Center

Michelle Ingels
(203) 254-9957
2425 Post Road
Southport, CT
Company
New England Family Health Associates
Industry
Acupuncturist, Herbalist, Nutritionist
Specialties & Therapies
Specialties : Women's Health

Therapies : Family Medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Prenatal Care

Data Provided By:
Jenny Craig
(203) 799-3714
108 Boston Post Rd
Orange, CT
Alternate Phone Number
(203) 799-3714
Services
Weight Loss, Diet Plans

Paulina Rose
(203) 764-9199
2 Church St S,# 511
New Haven, CT
Hours
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday: Closed

Data Provided By:

BASICS OF NUTRITION PHYSIOLOGY

1. The Raw Material - Calories in Food

All physical activity requires energy, and that energy is provided by the food we eat. Although we often view the bakery stop after a ride as just a pleasant reward, smart eating is essential to enjoying our riding and, for those in competitive situations, optimal performance.

All foods are composed of three nutritional building blocks - carbohydrates, fats, and protein - plus water and fiber (indigestible and without any food value). Carbohydrates contain 4.1 Calories per gram and are the primary energy source for most cyclists as well as athletes involved in short, maximum performance events. Fats are more important as an energy source for slower, endurance events. Protein , is used in maintaining and repairing cells, and is rarely an energy source for physical activity except in certain unique situations (such as malnutrition).

How much energy is in the food we eat (or what is a Calorie)?

Some foods contain more energy per ounce (or gram) than others. Not only does the fiber content (a filler with little or no Caloric value) of foods vary, the energy contained in equal weights of the pure basic building blocks - carbohydrate, fat, and protein - is not equivalent. In the nutritional literature, the energy content of any food is, by convention, expressed in Calories (note the capital "C") as opposed to the use of calories (small "c") or kilojoules (kj) in the scientific literature. The energy of one nutritional Calorie is equal to a kilocalorie (1000 calories - lower case "c") or 4.18 kilojoules.

Carbohydrates and protein each contain a little more than 4 Calories of energy per gram while a gram of fat has more than double the energy value at 9 Calories per gram.

2. Converting food Calories to power your muscles

Carbohydrate Calories supply the majority of the energy for muscles during vigorous activity. Fats are important for less strenuous, endurance type activities. Proteins are, in general, not an energy source for muscle activity.

Carbohydrate is provided to the muscle cell from 1) food you are eating or 2) stored carbohydrate in the form of glycogen in muscle and liver cells. On a normal diet, while fasting, there is enough stored glycogen to support 2 hours of high level exercise before these reserves are depleted and the bonk occurs. These internal stores can be extended with oral carbohydrate Calories. Thus, using carbohydrate supplements for events expected to last more than 2 hours is s smart strategy to maximize your performance. It is best to begin these carbohydrates at the start of the event as they are much less effective when one is trying to catch up after the bonk has occurred. A well trained cyclist will need slightly more than 1 gram of carbohydrate per minute to sustain maximum performance, and oral supplementation (started at the beginning of the exercise, not after glycogen depletion has occurred, at that rate) should b...

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