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CYCLING PERFORMANCE TIPS

"Knowledge is the key to improving your cycling performance."

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Orthopedic Surgeons West New York NJ

Orthopedic surgeons use surgical and non-surgical methods to treat musculoskeletal trauma, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders. See below to find local orthopedic surgeons in West New York that give access to treatment for knee arthroscopy, and lumbar spinal fusion, as well as advice and content on pediatric orthopedics and surgical sports medicine.

Baghal Imad
(201) 662-8455
7512 Kennedy Blvd
North Bergen, NJ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Anca Popa MD
(201) 662-9122
1 Marine Plz
North Bergen, NJ
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Codel Radu
(201) 969-0994
968 River Rd
Edgewater, NJ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Stephen Fealy, MD
(212) 606-1894
523 E 72nd St
New York, NY
Business
Stephen Fealy MD
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Carmody John
(201) 216-1040
1 Mainview Plaza
Hoboken, NJ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Dauharje Teofilo
(201) 319-9023
1625 Kennedy Blvd
North Bergen, NJ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Elias Kassapidis, MD
(212) 265-2828
36 W 60th St
New York, NY
Business
Riverside Orthopaedics
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Armin M. Tehrany, MD
(212) 758-3939
515 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Business
Armin M Tehrany MD PC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: All plans except Medicaid and HIP
Medicare Accepted: Yes
Workmens Comp Accepted: Yes
Accepts Uninsured Patients: Yes
Emergency Care: No

Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: The Mount Sinai Hospital
Residency Training: Lenox Hill Hospital
Medical School: New York University School of Medicine, 1994
Additional Information
Languages Spoken: English,Spanish,Persian

Data Provided By:
William L. Jaffe
(212) 427-7750
1095 Park Ave
New York, NY
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Marvin S Gilbert, MD
(212) 289-0700
1065 Park Ave
New York, NY
Business
Manhattan Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Leg, Knee, and Hip Pain

 



Knee and hip pain are the most common cycling injuries. The most common cause of knee (and hip pain) in cyclists is iliotibial band (IT band) syndrome. The IT band is a thick fibrous band of tissue, which runs on the outside of the leg from the hip to the knee. Pain is caused when the band becomes tight and rubs over the bony prominences of the hip (greater trochanter) and/or the knee (lateral epicondyle). Tight inflexible lower extremity muscles may worsen the condition.

As injury is generaly a problem of overuse, it is often seen in the cyclist just beginning a training program or early in the training season when the temptation is to do too much too fast. In order to minimize knee and hip pain in the early season, take it easy for the first few weeks - pedal with low resistance and keep that cadence up to at least 80-90 rpm allowing your body to adjust again to road riding. (Likewise with any change that leads to a slightly new bike position.) Minimize hard riding or hill work for the first few weeks. Add in a stretching program for your lower extremities, especially for the gluteus and IT band to help transition you into your riding season.

The most common causes are:

  • Faulty saddle height or position
  • Crank too long - especially if you have chondromalacia
  • Pushing excessively high gears (slow cadence in cold weather)
  • Too much leg work in the gym
  • Cleat alignment
  • Individual cyclist anatomy

And finally don't forget about the low back as playing a role in leg pain - especially the back of the leg and hamstrings. All leg pain is not from problems "where it hurts".

Q. I have a question about lower back and leg pain that I sometimes experience while riding. Sometimes when I am riding my legs will become so racked with pain that I can no longer pedal. I know I have lower back issues from years of heavy Olymic style weightlifting, but this is ridiculous. Sometimes I cannot climb even the smallest hills without stiffness and pain so bad that I almost black out. Any ideas? SG

A. A lot of leg pain is really back pain. So if you have a history of low back problems from the past, I'd start with a good massage therapist that deals with sports injuries combined with a program of back stretches.

Knee Pain

Knee Pain Location

One way to classify knee pain (and identify possible solutions) is to look at the location of the pain.

  • Anterior (see chondromalacia below)
    • Reasons
      • patellar tendonitis
      • patellofemoral syndrome
    • Causes
      • pushing BIG gears - cadence too low
      • saddle too low or too far forward
      • foot too far forward on the pedal
      • crank arms too long
      • leg length discrepancy with seat set for shorter leg
    • Possible solutions
      • ride at 75 rpm or higher
      • raise seat (in small increments of less than 5mm) or move seat back
      • move cleat forward 1 to 2 mm
      • shorten crank arms by 2.5 cm
      • set seat for longer, not shorter, leg with correction for the shorter leg
  • Posterior
    • Reasons
      • hamstri...

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