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CYCLING PERFORMANCE TIPS

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Orthopedic Surgeons Vinton VA

Orthopedic surgeons use surgical and non-surgical methods to treat musculoskeletal trauma, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders. See below to find local orthopedic surgeons in Vinton that give access to treatment for knee arthroscopy, and lumbar spinal fusion, as well as advice and content on pediatric orthopedics and surgical sports medicine.

Cassandra Mierisch
(540) 266-6950
204 S Maple St
Vinton, VA
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Michael L Woods, DDS
(540) 563-9398
623 Abney Rd NW
Roanoke, VA
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Dr.John Edwards
(540) 981-8668
2017 South Jefferson Street
Roanoke, VA
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Va Commonwealth Univ, Med Coll Of Va Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1974
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 2, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Cesar Bravo
(540) 981-8668
2017 Jefferson St Sw
Roanoke, VA
Specialty
Hand Surgery

Data Provided By:
Dallas P Crickenberger, MD
PO Box 8969
Roanoke, VA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Va Sch Of Med, Charlottesville Va 22908
Graduation Year: 1966

Data Provided By:
Michael Wayne Wolfe
(540) 266-6950
204 S Maple St
Vinton, VA
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Alfred Ainsley Durham, MD
(540) 772-3530
4910 Valley View Blvd NW
Roanoke, VA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Temple Univ Sch Of Med, Philadelphia Pa 19140
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided By:
Thomas Edwin Shuler, MD
(540) 981-8345
Roanoke, VA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Sc Sch Of Med, Columbia Sc 29208
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided By:
John Reynolds Edwards, MD
PO Box 13367
Roanoke, VA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Va Commonwealth Univ, Med Coll Of Va Sch Of Med, Richmond Va 23298
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided By:
Thomas Shuler
(540) 981-8668
2017 Jefferson St Sw
Roanoke, VA
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Leg, Knee, and Hip Pain

 



Knee and hip pain are the most common cycling injuries. The most common cause of knee (and hip pain) in cyclists is iliotibial band (IT band) syndrome. The IT band is a thick fibrous band of tissue, which runs on the outside of the leg from the hip to the knee. Pain is caused when the band becomes tight and rubs over the bony prominences of the hip (greater trochanter) and/or the knee (lateral epicondyle). Tight inflexible lower extremity muscles may worsen the condition.

As injury is generaly a problem of overuse, it is often seen in the cyclist just beginning a training program or early in the training season when the temptation is to do too much too fast. In order to minimize knee and hip pain in the early season, take it easy for the first few weeks - pedal with low resistance and keep that cadence up to at least 80-90 rpm allowing your body to adjust again to road riding. (Likewise with any change that leads to a slightly new bike position.) Minimize hard riding or hill work for the first few weeks. Add in a stretching program for your lower extremities, especially for the gluteus and IT band to help transition you into your riding season.

The most common causes are:

  • Faulty saddle height or position
  • Crank too long - especially if you have chondromalacia
  • Pushing excessively high gears (slow cadence in cold weather)
  • Too much leg work in the gym
  • Cleat alignment
  • Individual cyclist anatomy

And finally don't forget about the low back as playing a role in leg pain - especially the back of the leg and hamstrings. All leg pain is not from problems "where it hurts".

Q. I have a question about lower back and leg pain that I sometimes experience while riding. Sometimes when I am riding my legs will become so racked with pain that I can no longer pedal. I know I have lower back issues from years of heavy Olymic style weightlifting, but this is ridiculous. Sometimes I cannot climb even the smallest hills without stiffness and pain so bad that I almost black out. Any ideas? SG

A. A lot of leg pain is really back pain. So if you have a history of low back problems from the past, I'd start with a good massage therapist that deals with sports injuries combined with a program of back stretches.

Knee Pain

Knee Pain Location

One way to classify knee pain (and identify possible solutions) is to look at the location of the pain.

  • Anterior (see chondromalacia below)
    • Reasons
      • patellar tendonitis
      • patellofemoral syndrome
    • Causes
      • pushing BIG gears - cadence too low
      • saddle too low or too far forward
      • foot too far forward on the pedal
      • crank arms too long
      • leg length discrepancy with seat set for shorter leg
    • Possible solutions
      • ride at 75 rpm or higher
      • raise seat (in small increments of less than 5mm) or move seat back
      • move cleat forward 1 to 2 mm
      • shorten crank arms by 2.5 cm
      • set seat for longer, not shorter, leg with correction for the shorter leg
  • Posterior
    • Reasons
      • hamstri...

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