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CYCLING PERFORMANCE TIPS

"Knowledge is the key to improving your cycling performance."

- CPT mission statement -

Dietitian for Cyclists Edison NJ

Local resource for dietitians for cyclists in Edison. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to nutrition tips for cyclists and competitive athletes like carbohydrate training diets, daily protein requirement information, carbohydrate loading programs, and information on overall fluid balance as well as advice and content on nutritional training programs and maintaining energy stores.

Michele Berger
(732) 966-0130
220 Forsgate Drive
Jamesburg, NJ
Company
Nutrition Solutions
Industry
Nutritionist, Registered Dietitian
Specialties & Therapies
Specialties : Cholesterol, Eating Disorders, Gastrointestinal Concerns, Obesity, Weight Loss

Therapies : Nutritional Counseling, Whole Foods Cooking
Insurance
Medicare, Cigna, Blue Cross / Blue Shield, Aetna, PPO
Professional Affiliations
American Dietetic Association

Data Provided By:
Lia Kratzer, RD
(732) 636-6622
Family Medical Center1 Woodbridge Center Dr, Ste 400
Woodbridge, NJ
 
Betsy R Dubov, MS, RD
(732) 816-1651
123 Dunhams Corner Rd
East Brunswick, NJ
 
Edward A Lemmo, PHD, RD
(718) 967-5880
Lemmo AssociatesPO Box 338
Staten Island, NY
 
Ann Newswanger, CDE, RD
(908) 272-7586
114 Claremont Place
Cranford, NJ
 
Diane D Weeks, RD
(732) 744-5817
FK Medical Center65 James St
Edison, NJ
 
Ann M Chicchi, MS, RD
(732) 254-7896
64 Frost Ave
East Brunswick, NJ
 
Kathrine A Berdebes, MS, RD
(908) 456-5123
514 Carleton Rd
Westfield, NJ
 
Elizabeth Bongo, CDE, RD
(908) 232-4263
Medical Diagnostics Associates P.A.215 North Ave W
Westfield, NJ
 
Laura Celardo Giannon, CDN, MS, RD
(718) 948-6600
4641 B Hylan Blvd
Staten Island, NY
 
Data Provided By:

NUTRITION FOR TRAINING AND PERFORMANCE

 



The following basic nutrition plan for the competitive athlete is based on an understnding of the principles of the physiology of nutrition covered elsewhere.

To review, the most important of these concepts include:

  • a high carbohydrate training diet is a must to maximize your internal (liver and muscle) glycogen stores.
  • there may be a slight increase in daily protein requirements, with training, but replacement needs can be met with 1 gram protein/kg body wt/day.
  • When training regularly, or riding multiday, endurance events, Caloric expenditures need to be consciously replaced to counteract the appetite suppression that follows from long hours of training.
  • a 3 day, pre event, carbohydrate loading program gives you an edge in maximizing muscle/liver glycogen storage.
  • a 4 hour pre event meal should be utilized to top off glycogen stores.
  • some riders experience intestinal distress or symptoms of hypoglycemia if they eat in the 2 to 4 hours immediately before an event.
  • Calories must be taken during an event of greater than 2 hours duration to avoid depleting your internal energy (glycogen) stores. Solid foods may offer some advantages in longer events, ridden at slower paces, but in high exertion (> 70 - 80 % VO2max) liquid supplements minimize problems from delayed gastric emptying.
  • be particularly sensitive to your overall fluid balance (loss vs replacement) as the risks of OVERHYDRATION as well as DEHYDRATION increase with longer events. The best strategy is to weigh yourself regularly during training as well as after/during longer events.
  • salt replacement beyond that in a normal diet (ie commercially available sports drinks) is necessary only under extreme conditions or in events lasting 8 to 10 hours or more .

    RECOMMENDED NUTRITION PLAN

    The following comments are intended for maximizing glycogen stores for competitive events and long distance recreational rides. They are NOT meant as a general prescription for 1 to 2 hour weekend outings. Specific recommendations based on type of ride can be found elsewhere.

    First, let's review a few tips that can be of benefit in a nutritional training program.

    • Practice eating while cycling - your stomach needs to get used to handling food while exercising. You cannot "train" your digestive system to get bigger or stronger, but you can define your own limitations and personal digestive quirks before the day of the big ride.
    • Don't switch foods on ride day - stay with the on the bike foods you are use to eating.
    • Make it simple for your digestive system - use processed breads rather than whole grains, liquids rather than solids, cooked vegetables instead of raw ones, and minimze fat.
    • Don't fill up before the finish - anything you eat in the last 30 minutes will probably still be in your stomach, and if you sprint at the end, it increases the incidence of nausea and vomiting.
    • Train more - the best way to improve digesti...

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